Review: The Siren by Tiffany Reisz (@tiffanyreisz) #erotic #bookreview

Review: The Siren by Tiffany Reisz (@tiffanyreisz) #erotic #bookreview

The Siren
The Siren by Tiffany Reisz
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

After reading a few of Tiffany Reisz’ previous “Original Sinners” stories, I thought I had a pretty good idea what to expect before I even picked up The Siren. Boy, I was wrong. (A common theme when I assume anything with respect to Ms. Reisz) While it has the BDSM elements and dark romantic style I have come to expect, this tale was much more than that.

The story follows MC, Nora Sutherlin, an erotic writer, who seeks the help of editor, Zach Easton to get her book ready for publication (in six weeks). He is unimpressed with her work ethic and unaware of her “night job”. Her young assistant, Wes, however, is. And he doesn’t like it one bit.

I’m not one to reveal plots or give spoilers in reviews, so I will stop there with respect to storyline. Suffice to say, things get a bit complicated.

What I will say is Tiffany Reisz has a gift for description and dialog. Her characters jump from the page and the story breathes with realism and life. The accolades she is receiving for this novel are well deserved.

This is a must read for erotic romance fans, especially those who still need to get the nasty taste of the mediocre “50 Shades” out of their systems.

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Book Review: Charlinder’s Walk by Alyson Miers #dystopian (@novelpublicity)

Book Review: Charlinder’s Walk by Alyson Miers #dystopian (@novelpublicity)

Charlinder's Walk
Charlinder’s Walk by Alyson Miers
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I would preface this review by stating that I have not read a great deal of dystopian fiction, nor am I a huge fan of futuristic tales, but Charlinder’s Walk wasn’t quite what I expected it would be going into the novel. The story is presented with a more fantasy feel, than a sci-fi futuristic style, which I did appreciate and respond well to.

Charlinder’s walk is the tale of a teacher in 2130, Charlinder, who decides to embark on a journey to learn the origins of the plague that ravaged the planet in 2012. He is rather unprepared for what he might find, but intent to learn all he can about the past and the causes of the plague with the hope he, and his people may find a way to keep it from happening again.

Ms Miers writing style is easy to read and understand, while not losing any of it’s descriptive qualities. Some of the longer diary sequences in the novel I found a bit distracting — not for their content or the times when the author breaks to them, but the large sections of italics text were a little tough on my eyes and I found each time they popped up, I was jarred a bit from the depths of the tale and had to work my way back into it.

Im not one to post spoilers in my reviews, so I won’t go heavy into the plotline, but would state that the story explores Charlinder’s voyage to adulthood in a world much bigger than he’d ever expected when he started his trek. It also touches on religious ideals, gender roles, and holistic healing methods. All interesting stuff.

I would suggest Charlinder’s Walk without reservation to any dystopian fiction fans, or anyone interested in a well written coming of age tale with some really interesting and unique plot twists.

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Novel Publicity Blog Tour Notes:

Wanna win a $50 gift card or an autographed copy of Charlinder’s Walk? Well, there are two ways to enter…

  1. Leave a comment on my blog. One random commenter during this tour will win a $50 gift card. For the full list of participating blogs, visit the official Charlinder’s Walk tour page.
  2. Enter the Rafflecopter contest!  I can’t host Rafflecopter here, but visit the Official Tour Page to enter.

About the author:

Alyson Miers was born into a family of compulsive readers and thought it would be fun to get on the other side of the words. She attended Salisbury University, where she majored in English Creative Writing for some reason, and minored in Gender Studies. In 2006, she did the only thing a 25-year-old with a B.A. in English can do to pay the rent: joined the Peace Corps. At her assignment of teaching English in Albania, she learned the joys of culture shock, language barriers and being the only foreigner on the street, and got Charlinder off the ground. She brought home a completed first draft in 2008 and, between doing a lot of other stuff such as writing two other books, she managed to ready it for publication in 2011. She regularly shoots her mouth off at her blog, The Monster’s Ink, when she isn’t writing fiction or holding down her day job. She lives in Maryland with her computer and a lot of yarn. Connect with Alyson on her website,blog, Facebook,Twitter or GoodReads.

Get Charlinder’s Walk on Amazon or Barnes & Noble.

Book Review: Immersed in Pleasure by Tiffany Reisz (@tiffanyreisz)

Book Review: Immersed in Pleasure by Tiffany Reisz (@tiffanyreisz)

Immersed in PleasureImmersed in Pleasure by Tiffany Reisz

My rating: 3,5 of 5 stars

3.5 stars for a unique, romantic, modern day tale with an almost fairy tale feel.

After my first foray into Tiffany Reisz’ writing with SEVEN DAY LOAN, I thought I knew what to expect with IMMERSED IN PLEASURE. I was pretty wrong. Where the former was dark and sultry, this short was sweet and light.

I’ve not read a Spice Brief before, so I don’t know if they are all about the same length, but this was a bit short for me to really sink myself into the characters enough to be emotionally vested in whether or not the main characters, Derek and Xenia actually “make it”. More sweet and romantic than sultry or erotic, I think the length may have done a disservices to the readers investment in the characters. Despite that, this was a well spent hour or two and I enjoyed the twist on the traditional Little Mermaid tale.

I loved Fathoms, and quite frankly would love to visit a club like that at some point in my lifetime. I could totally see there being a ritzy themed club like that in LA or NYC.

I’d have given it a solid 4 stars, if not for the super short length to it, as Tiffany Reisz’ ability to weave words is something I, as an author aspire to.

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Bex Brennan:

A review of Eternal by J.A. Belfield

Originally posted on The Machenwood Chronicles and Other Tales:

Eternal
Eternal by J.A. Belfield
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I read Darkness and Light, the first novel in the Holloway Pack series, so I was really interested to see what this prequel novella had in store for me. I was not the least bit disappointed.

In this short, we meet the original Sean and Jem (circa 1800’s). If you read Darkness and Light, you understand what that means. I really enjoyed getting a look at the beginning of the Sean/Jem saga, and seeing how that first pair managed to “make it”.

I love the Sean in this one and how adorably gruff he is. I particularly liked the way he was so afraid of Jem’s mom when he was trying to muster the courage to ask for her hand in marriage. Ms. Belfield did a great job sinking the reader into the historical 1800s setting and dealt with the…

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Book Review: The House of Order by John Paul Jaramillo #review @novelpublicity #giveaway

Book Review: The House of Order by John Paul Jaramillo #review @novelpublicity #giveaway

The House of Order: Stories
The House of Order: Stories by John Paul Jaramillo

My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

3.5 of 5 stars

House of Order may be one of the more gripping, interesting and unusual collections of short stories I have ever read. I have to admit, it took me a little while to “get into” the book, as the MC, Manito, uses quite a bit of Spanish in the stories. It has been far too long since I have read any Spanish, so that held me at arms length for a bit.

Once I got past the feeling of being on the outside looking in, I was able to really sink myself into these short tales as narrated by Manito’s uncle, Neto.

John Paul Jaramillo paints a bleak, but vivid picture of the harshness of Hispanic life after the steel industry closes down. I really like the style he uses — a minimalistic approach as it were, telling and showing us so much with so few words. He holds nothing back, making sure to show us the brutality of the lives they lived. We see the Ortiz family struggle with drugs, alcohol, religion and familial abuse.

At only 108 pages, the stories are short and to the point, but even with their brevity, they speak volumes about what it was like to grow up in that harsh environment, and I really felt like I had a much better understanding of the Hispanic male psyche by the time I finished the last page. I would warn that this is not what I would consider a “happily ever after” type of book. I found myself a bit broody when I was finished — as some of the truths and realities expressed in the book are just that heartbreaking.

I think of all the stories (or chapters), my favorite would me “Little Blue Box”. The story had me laughing out loud and my boyfriend wondering what the heck I was reading that had me so entertained.

Despite being a white, Irish girl, I still felt drawn into the experiences of the characters as if I was living through them alongside Neto and his family.

Overall, I would say I enjoyed this book much more than I expected, and would give it 3.5 of 5 stars.

I would recommend this one to any fan of short story collections and for anyone looking for a glimpse of what life is really like in a Hispanic family.

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Wanna win a $50 gift card or an autographed copy of The House of Order?

Well, there are two ways to enter…

  1. Leave a comment on my blog. One random commenter during this tour will win a $50 gift card. For the full list of participating blogs, visit the official House of Order tour page.
  2. Enter the Rafflecopter contest! You can enter on the official House of Order tour page–since I can’t host rafflecopter contests on WordPress.

About the author: John Paul Jaramillo grew up in Southern Colorado but now lives, writes and teaches in Springfield, Illinois. He earned his MFA in creative writing (fiction) from Oregon State University and, currently, holds the position of Associate Professor of English in the Arts and Humanities Department of Lincoln Land Community College. Connect with John Paul on his website, Facebook, Twitter or GoodReads.

Get The House of Order on Amazon or Barnes & Noble.

Book Review: Tidal Whispers Anthology (Multiple Authors) @jtaylorpub

Book Review: Tidal Whispers Anthology (Multiple Authors) @jtaylorpub

Tidal Whispers
Tidal Whispers by Jocelyn Adams
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

4.5 Stars for this wonderful collection of Undersea tales.

Tidal Whispers is a collection of 4 tales, all with an ocean theme. My obsession with the sea made it easy for me to be sucked in by these four well-weaved stories.

In order to fully appreciate the book, I thought the review should really contain an individual look at each of the stories contained in the anthology.

Heart’s Desire by Julie Reece:

For me, this was the perfect story to start this anthology with. Ms Reece has a gift for descriptions, and I was immediately drawn into the story of Tessa, a young girl lost, feeling alone in the world, and suffering the loss of her parents. The emotions are heart stirring, raw, and really well presented. Cam, her love interest in the story is a boy she grew up spending summers with.

I really liked the feel of this tale. Much of it reminded me of summers I spent at the shore, and the friends I saw but once a year and always had such close ties to. I only wish the story’s ending wasn’t as easy to see coming as it was. Overall, a really great kick start to the collection.

The Sweetest Song by Claire Gillian:

This tale had a bit darker tone to it than the first. For me, a nice contrast. In this second offering, we meet Circe, a siren in trouble with Poseidon, and must find a way to sink a ship the Sea lord has his sights set on or suffer a fate worse than death — lose her voice and serve as his concubine for eternity.

I really enjoyed the twists in this tale. I didn’t see them coming and found the uniqueness of the story quite refreshing. Just the right touches of romance and mythos, made this tale a real winner for me.

The Pearl of Pau’Maa by Kelly Said:

This story was the most complex and “adventure” oriented of the four tales in the book. While Ms. Said also feeds us a nice dose of romance, for the most part, this story relies more heavily on the legend of the pearl and the people in the world she paints for us. Another fantastically descriptive writer, Ms. Said had me drawn in from the opening paragraphs. I really enjoyed the dual POV in this tale, and felt getting a glimpse from each perspective really helped make this story resonate. I will be looking for more from this author.

The Undergarden by Jocelyn Adams:

I have come to expect nothing but the best from Ms Adams’ stories after reading get novel, The Glass Man, and this tale certainly did not disappoint.

The sweet, and somewhat sad tale of Nixie and her sometimes reluctant best friend, Wyatt was the perfect close to this wonderful collection. Ms. Adams always seems to write the most interesting characters, and I think little Nixie may just be one of my favorites. Her innocence shines throughout the story and makes the reader hard pressed not to want to route for her. I have a soft spot for water sprites, too — making this one a MUST read for me.

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Book Review: You Never Have to Remember The Truth by Kelly Moran and Dominick Gugliatto

Book Review: You Never Have to Remember The Truth by Kelly Moran and Dominick Gugliatto

You Never Have to Remember the Truth: The Nick Gugliatto Story
You Never Have to Remember the Truth: The Nick Gugliatto Story by Dominic Gugliatto
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I came into this book not really sure what to expect. It is the first memoir I have ever read, so I don’t have any basis of comparison, nor reason to believe this would be the type of book I would enjoy. But, when I decided to make public my opinion about the things I read, I also decided it meant I would have to broaden my literary horizons. I would have to read something other than fiction.

I was absolutely pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed reading this story. As the description for the book aptly explains, the story is Nick Gugliatto’s version of events surrounding his aiding Lawrencia Bembenek to escape from prison, where she was incarcerated for murder. I don’t remember the crime, personally, so all of the story was new for me. It was really interesting to see through the proverbial peep hole into something that apparently held the eye of the media for some time.

The author cleverly weaves the facts and doles them out in a way that gives the impression of sitting across from Nick at the kitchen table while he recounts his actions and the reasoning and truth behind them. The story was more a novella in length–perfect to my estimations. I never felt bored or dragged along during the read. After this, I would say I might just be a fan of this type of work. A must read for true crime addicts and those with an eye for conspiracies or the inner workings of the justice system.

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ONE LUCKY COMMENTER WILL WIN A FREE EBOOK COPY OF THE BOOK, So share your thoughts below!!! Here is one time when it doesn’t pay to be shy :P

 

Interview with Kelly Moran:

Bex: At what point in your life did you realize you wanted to be a writer?

Kelly: LOL. When I first learned to talk? As far back as I can remember, these characters and stories have been in my head.

Bex: What would you consider to be the best book you have ever read?

Kelly: Oh man. So unfair. Um… There’s quite a few. Pride & Prejudice–for the ultimate tease. A Cottage By the Sea, by CJ Ware–for thousands of reasons. Seaside Letters, by Denise Hunter–so sad and sweet. Jill Shalvis’ Lucky Harbour series is awesome. Gena Showalter’s Lords of the Underworld series rocks. You know, we could be here all day. I’m refusing to answer!

Bex: What is it that you like to do when you’re not reading/writing?

Kelly: Hm. What I like to do or have to do? I love sappy movies, cooking, MLB, and NFL. Other than that, sleeping when I can. Oh, coffee and chocolate. I have 3 young boys, so I do a lot of chasing too.

Bex: If I came to visit early in the morning would you impress me as being more like a chirpy bird or a grumpy bear?

Kelly: Oh, definitely a grumpy bear. Unless you brought coffee. I wouldn’t eat you then. :)

Bex: Describe what it’s like to be an author in three words.

Kelly: Frustrating. Lonely. Limitless.

Bex: What one word best describes you?

Kelly: Stubborn.

Bex: Say your publisher has offered to fly you anywhere in the world to do research on an upcoming book, where would you most likely want to go?

Kelly: England or Ireland. I’m Irish, and would love to see it. I have author friends in the UK, and there’s so much history there. Why? Can you arrange this?

Bex: I so wish!
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